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Successful Closing Exercises of the Public Kindergarten

The Kindergarten Children invite you to their Closing on

Tuesday, December the twenty-second at 10 oclock, 1903.

[Welland Tribune, 25 December 1903]

Neat little dimity cards with the foregoing and a miniature drawing of an Xmas stocking filled with presents, were the invitations received by the children’s parents and a few friends.

The kindergarten being now a branch of our public educational system, there was more interest than usual taken in the Christmas closing, and it was truly a delighted audience which gathered at the Central school on Tuesday morning to see the little tots go through the different exercises and drills, the result of the term’s  training. The visitors were warmly greeted by Miss Mackie and her assistant, Miss Willson, and seated in the kindergarten room.

The kindergarten children present numbered 24, and were grouped together at two long tables at the front. On the blackboards were many beautiful and artistic colored illustrations by Miss Mackie. An Xmas tree covered with presents by the children was in one corner.

Shortly after the appointed hour the proceedings opened with a beautiful prayer by the children. Then they sang many songs all of which were descriptive of some occupation or fact, and were asked questions concerning each song, which they answered promptly and correctly. Each song was accompanied by representative motions. Singing is one of the best methods of impressing a thought on a child’s mind. The Christmas hymns taught the children about the birth of Christ, and his mission to earth. The “Good Morning” song was a very pretty one, and told of the opening of the day and the rising of the sun. Then came several songs of the approaching winter and signs thereof, such as the blackbird’s flight, etc. The appearance of Jack Frost brought out the need of warm woolen clothing. From what animal the wool is obtained, and who kept the sheep, and where and how they were kept, were among the questions asked and correctly answered. Several songs all closely connected, told of the transformation of the grain to bread. The farmer’s work in preparing the soil was first taken up, then the sowing of the seed, the growth of the grain, the harvest, the grist mill and its propelling power, the flour, and then the baker and his products. The song about Santa Claus, describing his person, occupation and manner of distributing presents, was entered into heartily by the pupils, who fairly shouted for joy. Several Christmas songs, including one about the presents the children had made throughout the term, were next sung after which the presents were taken off the tree and given to the pupils who gave them to their parents. They were neat little sachets and napkin rings and really showed wonderful skill considering the age of the pupils making them.

Marches and drills were next in order, all of which was extremely interesting to the spectators, and in which the children excelled and took great delight. Sewing cards were then distributed with outlines on them, which were traced out by the children with needle and thread.

The children were then asked what game they would like to play, and chose the ball game without hesitation. This consisted of trying to roll the ball so that they would stop in a ring in the centre of the room. Each successful effort was applauded by the children. They were then asked to pick out among the various colored balls the two colors that went best together, then to arrange them so that the colors blended, forming a rainbow. These developed the color test and taste. A test for the hearing was that one child was blindfolded, when another spoke, the former to recognize the voice. Another test was, one child was blindfolded and another left the room and the former being unmasked was to speak the name of the missing one. The art of deportment was taught in the dancing game and it was really surprising to see how well the little ones acted their parts. Other games which developed both body and mind were played but which we have not space to describe it.

A “Good Bye” song by the children closed one of the most interesting and pleasing events ever transpiring in Welland, and those who were present are now stronger than ever of the opinion that the Kindergarten under the able management of Miss Mackie, is a splendid institution for the town.


Valentine 1912That Was a Long Time Coming

By Edna Winthrop

[People’s Press, 18 February 1913]

              In 1849 Edward Poindexter left his home in the most east and his ladylove, Ellen Crane, to join the gold hunters in California. She received several letters from him, the last at the beginning of the new year, the mid-year of the nineteenth century. In this letter, Poindexter said: “I shall send you a valentine, calculating to mail it so that it shall reach you on the 14th of February. The mails are the surest means of transportation from here to the east, but, even they are not very regular. If you don’t receive my valentine, say, within ten days after Valentine’s day, go to the postoffice and inquire for it, writing me at the same time.”

             The 14th of February came, but no valentine. Instead a letter came saying that Poindexter had been taken ill a fortnight before and had died. He had struck a vein of ore, which he had instructed the writer to sell and send her the proceeds.

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[Welland Telegraph, 5 January 1912]

             We have here a handsome portrait of Alex. Brown’s team of oxen, Buck and Bright. This speedy pair was engaged for the summer on the Lyon’s Creek Drain contract, but has since been sold to a Jordan man. It is many years since Welland saw a pair of real oxen. The exhibit here is probably the last of the species. West Main street can be seen in the background.



Welland Telegraph, 23 December 1910

[Welland Telegraph, 27 December 1910]

             The streets on Saturday night were filled with parcel-laden people. Many did not heed the “shop early” advices and the stores on Saturday night did a rushing business.

             The manner in which Christmas Day was celebrated in the different homes varied. Christmas services were given in the churches and were attended by large crowds of Christmas worshipers. The weather was real Christmas weather, with plenty of snow on the ground. The sleighing was good.

             Hundreds from out of town spent the holidays with relatives. Others went out of town for Sunday and Monday. The Christmas travel on the trains surpassed all other years.

At the Post Office

             Business at the local post office during the holiday season just passed reached enormous proportions being double that of other years in some lines.

Promoting postcards..

WellandHistory.ca: An article about postcards that appeared in the People’s Press in 1906.

[People's Press, 1 May 1906]

A good way to see Welland is to look at the photograph postcards in the Tribune window. Thirty-four different views of the town. New ones added this week: Welland Opera house, Cordage Company’s big boarding house, East Main street, West Main street. Welland River bridge, T.H & B train crossing, M.C.R. bridge. It’s a cheap way too. It don’t cost much more to buy 3 for 10 cents; 8 for 25 cents-Tribune Stationery Store.