Welland History .ca

a project by S & B

Welcome to WellandHistory.ca

What’s NEW..

August 14, 2017 : We have a special story from E.R. Yatscoff in Tales: MEMORIES OF WELLAND by E.R. YATSCOFF, and his novels are listed in BOOKS.

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STORY OF A MOSQUITO

[Welland Tribune, 24 September 1897]

Contributed by Grace E. Robinson, fourteen years old daughter of John Robinson, Niagara Falls, Ont., and published in the “Home Queen,” Philadelphia.

STORY OF A MOSQUITO

There once lived a mosquito,
He was an insect small
He was very light and airy,
And possessed a lot of gall.
He was known as a deep drinker,
And deeper biter, too,
And you’d feel a little itching
When he’d finished up on you.

But all men ignored his genius,
And although it was absurd,
They resented all his efforts,
And he really felt injured.
But he said, “I’ll gain my purpose,”
And he bit me on the neck,
And I felt and said I’d like to
Break his naughty little back..

At this he thought he’d better
Beat a pretty swift retreat,
And accordingly he stretched his wings
And soon dislodged his feet.
Bit I caught him while escaping,
(What I did you may surmise),
They buried him at 2 p.m.,
In a Fairview grave he lies.

Hello Visitors!

WHY are we doing this project? ..To Preserve History.

Much information is being lost, newspapers destroyed, historic buildings being torn down, bridges disappearing. The children of today need to know the history of the towns where they live. We the people are the ones who can carefully preserve this precious history for them. It is our responsibility as the older generation to leave stories, pictures and artifacts for them so that when they become older and wonder what went before, it will be available.  That is what this website is about. Preserving the history of Welland for future generations.

An article from the The Welland Tribune and Telegraph, 11 July 1922, describes what we are trying to present with this website.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: We thank the The Welland Tribune and Telegraph for their contribution.

[IMAGE AT UPPER RIGHT]:This Colossal Project: Building the Welland Ship Canal, 1913-1932

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Search Tips..

Use the main Search box at the TOP RIGHT of this page for your general research. When you need a narrower search, you may like to use the Search feature in this post to limit a search within a Family group.

What’s HOT Off The Press..

EVENTS:
  • WELLAND CANAL TO BE ENLARGED - Important Statement by Mr. Tarte. [Welland Tribune, 24 September 1897] Hon. Mr. Tarte, minister of public works of Canada, having been charged with excessive expenditure in his department, and on promising the prosecution of ... read more
  • A NEW WORLD’S WONDER - THE ILLUMINATION OF NIAGARA FALLS AND WHIRLPOOL Grand Trunk’s Preparations for the Formal Opening of the New Steel Arch Bridge [Welland Tribune, 24 September 1897] At the present time the eyes of the whole world are directe... read more
  • THE ROLLER BOAT - Successfully Launched in Toronto Bay A New Departure in Marine Construction [Welland Tribune, 24 September 1897] Toronto, Ont., Sept. 9th- Frederick Augustus Knapp’s much-talked-of roller boat, which has been under construc... read more
  • FIFTY YEARS AGO - [Welland Tribune, 22 October 1897] This is the way it was bound to look When grandfather had his ”pleter took.” These were the shadows cast before The coming of Conjurer Daguerre And his art; like a girl in a pinafore Som... read more
  • SUICIDE OF A HORSE AT THE FALLS - [Welland Tribune, 30 July 1897] NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y., July 25- Hundreds of people visiting her today witnessed what seemed to have been the deliberate suicide of a fine looking chestnut colored horse, which swam out into the r... read more
  • GRIMSBY PARK NOTES - [Welland Tribune, 30 July 1897] After this week the Toronto boat will make daily trips. A large influx of visitors is expected during the first week of August. This would be a happy land for Clayt. Page. The electric light is... read more
  • SUMMERING AT GRIMSBY PARK - [Welland Tribune, 23 July 1897] GRIMSBY PARK, July 20-The season at this pretty summer home is at its height, and the month of August promises to be one of the most successful in its history. Those who come for a day have no ... read more
  • THE STEAMER LAKESIDE - Attempt To Burn the Vessel At Her Dock In St. Catharines-An Infernal Machine. [Welland Tribune, 25 July 1897] St. Catharines, June 20-An almost successful attempt was made about 11 o’clock on Saturday night to burn the stea... read more
‘]
TALES:
  • MEMORIES OF WELLAND by E.R. YATSCOFF - [August, 2017] I was born in the Welland Hospital and have two sisters, Elaine and Brenda, and a brother Fred. We lived on Deere St. with our parents Lorraine (from Saskatchewan) and Andrew (born in Detroit). Andrew worked at... read more
  • ANNA MARIA WADDELL - [Welland Tribune, 17 December 1897] Mrs. Waddell, aunt of Mrs. Chas. Lewis, died on Wednesday evening (8th) of last week at the age of 58 years, of typhoid pneumonia.  Interment took place at St. Paul’s cemetery on Friday ... read more
  • ELISHA C. TAYLOR - [Welland Tribune, 24 September 1897] Elisha C. Taylor, who died at his residence in Pelham on Thursday evening, Sept. 16th inst., was born on the farm on which he resided all his life, and which was purchased by his father, J... read more
  • J.C. HARRIS - A BUSINESS PIONEER OF THIS SECTION PASSES AWAY [Welland Tribune, 24 September 1897] For some time past J.C. Harris has been very ill, at times apparently somewhat improved and again becoming worse. He had a host of friends an... read more
  • SUICIDE AT THE FALLS - ELIZABETH MCROBERTS [WELLAND TRIBUNE, 24 September 1897] Niagara Falls, N.Y., Sept. 21-Mrs. Elizabeth McRoberts, 65 years of age, threw herself into the Niagara River just above the Falls this afternoon. Her body passed over ... read more
  • PHOEBE GAINER PALMER - [Welland Tribune, 10 September 1897] Died, August 13, Phoebe Gainer, beloved with of the late Wm. Palmer of Burlingame, Kansas, formerly a resident of Oxford Co., in the 75th year of her age. The above is the sister of Jacob ... read more
  • WILLIAM H. SHISLER - [Welland Tribune, 6 August 1897] Wm. H. Shisler, M.D., son of Jacob Shisler, is visiting in Welland county. He was once a student under geo. A. Clark at Fort Erie; passing the entrance he attended the Welland high school unde... read more
  • ELIZABETH DUNIGAN - [Welland Tribune, 2 May 1884] MRS. JOHN DUNIGAN- We are called this week to record the death of Mrs. John Dunigan, which occurred on Monday night last. Mrs. Dunigan was a native of Oneida, County, N.Y., was married to Mr. Dun... read more
‘]

SIGNS OF SPRING

[Canada First and other poems by James A Ross. 1920. Page 50.]

The sap is runnin’ from the tree,Spring Workshop -by- "B"
The crow is cawin’ loud
The sky is dancin’ bright and blue
And scatterin’ every cloud;
The bumble bees are buzzin’ round,
The air is like a dream;
We’ll soon be catchin’ catfish
From the old mill-stream.

The blackbird’s pourin’ forth his song,
The frog is croakin’ gay,
The robin flies from tree to tree
And pipes his merry lay;
The speckled hen is cacklin’ loud,
The sun sets pink and cream;
We’ll soon be catchin  catfish
From the old mill-stream.

The grass is springin’ fresh and green,
The tree-buds shootin’ out,
The blue-bells and the daisies
Are poppin’ all about;
The brook is tumblin’ o’er the rocks,
Its spray a silvery gleam;
We’re pullin’ out the catfish
From the old mill-stream.

KEEP A GOIN’

[Welland Tribune 6 August 1897]

If you strike a thorn or rose,
Keep a goin’.
If it hails or if it snows,
Keep a goin’.
Tain’t no use to set an whine
When the fish ain’t on your line,
Bait your hook and keep on tryin,’
Keep a goin’.

When the weather kills your crops,
Keep a goin’
When you tumble from the top,
Keep a goin’
S’pose your out’ o’ every dime,
Gettin’ broke ain’t any crime;
Tell the world your feelin’ prime.
Keep a goin’.

When it looks like all is up,
Keep a goin’.
Drain the sweetness from your cup,
Keep a goin’
See the wild birds on the wing,
Hear the bells that sweetly sing,
When you feel like sighin’ sing,
Keep a goin’.

Autumn Poem

The pumpkin’s lookin’ yellow,
And the buckwheat’s in the shock,
The blackbirds float across the sky
An hundred in a flock;
The clover fields are turnin’ gray,
The trees seem brown and sere,
The summertime is dyin’
And the winter’s creepin’ near;
Across the sea our soldier boys
Are fightin’ brave and bold–
I’m prayin God will shield them from the cold.

The black squirrel’s skippin’ round the tree,
And storin’ up his food,
The sky is lookin’ checkered
And reflects a stormy mood;
The muskrat’s buildin’ high and dry,
A thick-walled winter nest,
And the sun is droppin’ early
‘Neath the snowclouds of the west;
And over there our bravest boys
Are winnin what they’ll hold–
I’m prayin God will shield them from the cold.

The coon is stealin’ all the corn
To fill his hollow log,
The wild goose honks across the sky,
Before the frosty fog;
A snowflake’s fallin here and there,
The wind is blowin chill,
And the angry winter’s comin’
To frost the plain and hill;
The Pride of Canada is there,
The white sheep of the fold–
I’m prayin’ God will shield them from the cold.

Canada First and other poems by James A. Ross, 1920.

THE FROG HATCHERY

[Welland Telegraph, 18 September 1891]

There’s a hole filled with bull frogs galore
Just east of the Red Rocker furniture store
Where pollywogs thrive
And good citizens strive
Some plan to contrive
To keep the foul smell from their houses
Which the breeze o’er the frog pond arouses.

Filled with rubbish, and dirt, and old bones
Rags and tin cans, a few bricks and stones
Its water grow thick
Till the smell makes you sick
And you pass by it quick
Heave a sigh of relief as you strike the fresh air
Away from the fumes of the pollywogs’ lair.

It’s bad for the health of those who live near
It keeps them from sleep and diseases they fear
Go by when you please
One whiff of the breeze-
Whew! Limburger cheese!
Put a cork in your nose, give the place a wide berth
And make up your mind it’s the worst spot on earth.

Frog Hatchery -by- "B"

Its fame has gone forth through the land
The stale, heavy odor is always at hand
Till you close up your smeller
And swear at the “feller”
Who owns the old cellar
And vow if you had him-the man of such riches
You’d dump him right into it, body and breeches.

It’s a boon to the doctors and vendors of pills
For it adds a big chunk to their customers’ bills
The waters are green
With diseases they team
Till it’s well to be seen
That with typhoid and ague it’s filled to the top
That foul smelling hole on the old vacant lot.

Complaints had been made without number
Till the council woke up from their slumber
Then aldermen wise
With opening eyes
Paid heed to the cries
Of the public which turned up its suffering nose
And threatened such wanton neglect to expose.

The owners were told of its horrible state
And warned to get on to a good lively gait
And fill up the place
That was a menace
To the whole human race
Or the laws of the land would be brought into use
To compel them to drain off that hole full of juice.

The summer is over and still it remains-
No pen can describe the filth it contains-
So now, Mr. Mayor
To make the thing square
Rise up and declare
That the hole shall be filled and no time be lost
And the owners charged up with the whole of the cost.

THANKSGIVING MORN

By James A. Ross

Let all our voices ring with praise
To Him from whom all blessings flow.
Join in with harp, and may all strains
In one Thanksgiving chorus grow.
Give thanks for sunshine’s azure sky
Scarce e’er destroyed by storm king’s blast;
For memories dear, whose golden chain
Links present family to the past.
Give thanks for all the bounteous wealth
Of harvest gathered o’er the world:
For peace within our native land,
And Freedom’s ensign still unfurled.
Give thanks for wealth, for health, for life,
For ever blessing, great or small.
Praise Him in thought, in word, in deed;
The precious fountain of them all.

Taken from “Canada First and other poems by James A. Ross, 1920“